by CaroPosted on

New York based artist Eric White paints dreamlike images that he “disrupts” with elements of old Hollywood movies and glamour. We are usually looking at his subjects from strange angles, peering over their shoulders and into their vintage car interiors in a voyeuristic way. Previously featured on our blog, White’s work doesn’t seem to fit any particular visual category. The scenes he creates are unreal and defy logic but aren’t entirely Surrealism, and while figurative, cannot be called Realism – he has used the term “paranoid social realism.” He continues to exhibit his fascination with confined settings and cinema imagery in his latest series of oil paintings, which debuted last night at Serge Sorokko Gallery in San Francisco.

by CaroPosted on

On November 9, Eric White celebrated the opening of his new solo exhibition “All Of This Has Not Occurred” at Martha Otero Gallery. Inspired structurally and artistically by John Martin’s apocalyptic paintings, White generates a world seen through the eyes of his “watchman”: anxious, alert and powerful. White’s practice is centered around masterfully executed figurative painting, walking the line of surrealism. He uses film imagery to create dreamlike sequences, which are often disrupted when his subjects break the fourth wall to engage their viewer. Read more and view our opening night photos after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

In the 1960s, philosopher Guy Debord posited that there was no longer any authentic culture in the West because all of life had become mediated through images. Even the most mundane interactions, he said, had become imitations of what we see in advertising and movies. Eric White works off this premise in his upcoming solo show, “All of This Has Not Occurred,” opening at Martha Otero Gallery in LA this Saturday, November 9. A masterful draftsman and oil painter, White replicates the style of mid-20th-century commercial illustration, spinning the bold logos and happy, white faces into something hallucinatory and sinister. White refers to his work as Paranoid Social Realism, a realism that invites the viewers to question and distrust what they see. Take a look at a sneak peek of the work in the show after the jump.

by JL SchnabelPosted on

Currently on view at NYC’s Jonathan LeVine Gallery are three solo exhibitions by artists Eric White, Doze Green and Kevin Cyr (previewed here). Kevin Cyr was also covered by HF in HF vol.10. While each artist has their own distinct style, the work was threaded together by a focus on detail and color balance. While Green revealed a continuance of his intriguingly fluid style, White stunned with his impressively large works of manipulated film stills. Newcomer to the gallery, Kevin Cyr explored old vans costumed in street art, featuring an interesting twist on modern portraiture. View more images of the new works as well as opening night photos after the jump.

by JL SchnabelPosted on

Upcoming this Saturday May 19th are three solo exhibitions from artists Eric White, Doze Green and Kevin Cyr (Vol 10) at NYC’s Jonathan LeVine Gallery. The convergence of these three artists shows similar threads of color and detail, yet the thematic focus differs for each exhibition. For White, his new body of work continues along the vein of previous works, following cinematic snips from old films with his meticulous eye for detail. In contrast, Cyr also arrives armed with works focusing automobiles, specifically portraits of vehicles found on the streets of NYC. Green’s newest works explore the links between the natural and supernatural worlds in his engaging, bold fusion of mediums. View a preview of the works after the jump and stay tuned for opening night images next week, here on Hi-Fructose.

by JL SchnabelPosted on

‘Automatic’, Eric White’s newest solo show of stunning worksrecently opened overseas at Antonio Colombo in Milan. Focusing on a series ofpaintings compositionally held within the contained spaces of car interiors,the works exude a kind of voyeuristic claustrophobia. Film characters fromexisting narratives populate these confined scenes. Lifted from theirrespective films, they appear spatially re-imagined beneath his vision, whetheras doppelgangers or endless duplicates playing out alternate scenarios withinthe same space. As he was working on the last unfinished painting for the show,we were able to visit his studio and talk with him about his new work. View studio images and read the interview after the jump.