by CaroPosted on

Brooklyn based painter Beau Stanton has honed his artistic talent over the years with his mural works, adapting the techniques of his mandala-like nautical inspired paintings to his largescale mural works. Although he has painted in some of the most undoubtedly interesting places around the world, from the Berlin wall to the 12th century Crypt of Saint John the Baptist, featured here, his most recent mural presented a particularly unique challenge.

by CaroPosted on

Have you ever noticed how everything goes quiet before a storm- the air seems still and calm, when suddenly a line of ominous clouds appear? It’s an intriguing phenomenon that people have recognized for centuries, and the inspiration behind Beau Stanton and Logan Hicks’s exhibition, “Calm Before the Storm”. Their show, which opened last Friday at New York City’s Highline Loft, borrows from nautical stories, both true and mythical, and themes in classical painting.

by CaroPosted on

Beau Stanton has new works he describes as “enigmatic illuminations”, now on view at the Crypt of Saint John the Baptist in Bristol. Curated by Andy Phipps, the show’s title “Tenebras Lux” refers to darkness and light, created by these lit panels emerging out of the crypt’s dark, anicent space. The 9 stained glass panels combine elaborate oil painting with original medieval lead framework, inspired by Classical Antiquity and religious iconography that has long influenced Stanton.

by CaroPosted on

Last weekend, Corey Helford Gallery’s Circa opened Ray Caesar and Beau Stanton’s side by side solo shows. Each artist reveals something personal in his new series. For his previous showing at Circa, “New and Rare Works” (reviewed here), Caesar reflected on memories of his experiences at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto. Now with “A Tainted Virtue”, he’s diving even deeper into emotional themes that only his surreal fantasy heroines can express. Read more after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

On June 29, Last Rites Gallery opened two solo shows: Matt Buck’s “(A)part” and Beau Stanton’s “Arcane Archetypes.” Working with a mix of figuration and geometry, Stanton presented a series of mandala-like paintings. His symmetrical compositions to allude to Buddhist and Hindu religious iconography while creating a network of symbols of their own through repeating imagery. Meanwhile, Matt Buck’s new work applies geometry to the body — he chops up and compartmentalizes his characters until they take on otherworldly forms as they defy the laws of physics. Both “Arcane Archetypes” and “(A)part” will be on view through August 10. Take a look at some photos from the opening night by Paola Duran as well as some images of the artwork in the show after the jump!

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Influenced by 19th-century architecture and Greek mythology alike, New York-based artist Beau Stanton is known for his mandala-like artworks. Stanton uses a mixed technique of screen printing and painting, creating rhythmic, repetitive compositions that evoke mysticism and ritual. Erica Berkowitz of Last Rites Gallery recently visited Stanton’s studio and shot over some exclusive photos of Stanton at work on the pieces for his upcoming solo show at Last Rites, “Arcane Archetypes,” which opens on June 29. Take a look at our early sneak peek of the show after the jump and make sure to check out Beau Stanton and Matt Buck’s concurrent solo shows June 29 through August 10.