by CaroPosted on

There is a magical simplicity about Brookyn based painter Alyssa Monk’s oil portraits, where looking at her work is like looking into the reflection of a forest pool. Her images portray ghostly figures that take form at the surface, inbetween the reflection of other natural elements like tree branches and the sun shining peeking through their foliage. Her lush depictions are often described as a blend of the figurative and landscape.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Last weekend, San Francisco’s Mirus Gallery opened their group show, “The Looking Glass: Refraction through the Female Gaze.” Focused on female painters who create figurative works featuring primarily female subjects, the show demonstrated a diverse array of perspectives on the portrayal of femininity in the art world. Stand-out pieces included Alexandra Levasseur’s mixed-media works that reflect wintertime solitude and Sandra Chevrier’s colorful, expressive portraits. The complete roster of artists includes Kimberly Brooks, Sandra Chevrier, Naja Conrad-Hansen, Mercedes Helnwein, Alexandra Levasseur, Jen Mann, Sari Maxfield, Alyssa Monks, Jennifer Nehrbass, Casey O’Connell, Claire Pestaille, Rachel Walker, Janelle Wisehart and Christine Wu. Take a look at our exclusive opening night photos after the jump and check out the show before it closes on March 2.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While the percentage of female subjects depicted by male artists is disproportionately high in art history, Mirus Gallery aims to subvert the ever-present male gaze in Western art for the next exhibition, “The Looking Glass: Refraction through the Female Gaze.” Opening February 9, this group exhibition features female painters who depict female subjects in their work. The line-up of exhibiting artists include Kimberly Brooks, Sandra Chevrier, Naja Conrad-Hansen, Mercedes Helnwein, Alexandra Levasseur, Jen Mann, Sari Maxfield, Alyssa Monks, Jennifer Nehrbass, Casey O’Connell, Claire Pestaille, Rachel Walker, Janelle Wisehart and Christine Wu. Rather than portraying the female form as merely delicate or seductive, these artists challenge the norms of depicting the female body, using portraits of the so-called fairer sex to explore both cultural and personal themes. Take a look at our preview of “The Looking Glass” after the jump, images courtesy of Mirus Gallery.

by CaroPosted on

As part of our on-going Miami Art Week coverage, we also went to check out the best of the Miami Project and Art on Paper fairs. Though previously the home of NADA, this year, the Deauville Beach Resort on South Beach played host to the neighboring sister fairs. Miami Project is now in its fourth year and known for exhibiting lesser known galleries than the monstrous Basel, while Art on Paper focused on primarily paper works, though this was not a rule strictly followed by the work on display. Take a look at more of our highlights from Miami Project and Art on Paper after the jump!

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Currently on view at Sirona Fine Art in Hallandale Beach, Florida, “Artist’s Gaze: Seeing Women in the 21st Century” is a large group show featuring work focused on female subjects. With a wide variety of male and female artists in the show, “Artist’s Gaze” presents a survey of portraits — some intimate, some sensual, and some exuding female power and strength. Artists like Daliah Lina Ammer, Susannah Martin, Dorielle Caimi, Park Hyung Jin, and Delita Pinchback Martin (and many, many others) presented diverse depictions of womanhood that stray from typical, sexualized media portrayals of the female body. The show was curated by artist Victoria Sellbach, whose work is also featured, and is on view through March 15.

by Ken HarmanPosted on

In just a couple weeks, Copro Gallery in Santa Monica’s Bergamont Station will be playing host to the highly anticipated group show, ‘Dark Water.’ Curated by artist Martin Wittfooth, who was our cover feature in the recent Hi-Fructose Volume 19, ‘Dark Water’ culls from the murky depths a stellar line up of some of the new contemporary scenes best and brightest including Hi-Fructose cover artists Andrew Hem (HF Volume 21) and Josh Keyes (HF Volume 12.)

The theme of the show is as compelling and mysterious as the artist’s works themselves. From the darkest reaches of the soul to environmental imbalances, the subject of dark water can serve as an introspective and personal exploration, a social or environmental dialog, or both. The exhibit opens November 12th, get an exclusive first look here on Hi-Fructose.