by CaroPosted on

Gregory Euclide has always intertwined painting with nature-inspired elements; elaborately-rendered traditional, yet graphic landscapes, crumpled and scientifically sampled into otherworldly dioramas. First featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 14 and here on our blog, Euclide’s work has taken on several forms over the years, from his snow globe-like “bio-spherescapes” that seem to defy gravity and riverbeds ‘growing’ from spilled paint. He continues to challenge the typical “rules” for two and three-dimensional art, including his own.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

In the summer of 2012, Gregory Euclide showed his “Laid Down & Wiped Away” series, a succession of drawings essentially finger-painted by Euclide using the marker residue on his classroom whiteboard. Euclide, a high school teacher and environmentalist in addition to being an accomplished artist, created these works as a way to push himself to be creative during his 25-minute lunch period. Now, Euclide is presenting a solo show, “Whose Land We Laid Down & Wiped Away” at StolenSpace Gallery in London, to deeper explore the intellectual underpinnings of the first series. Read more after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Gregory Euclide (Hi-Fructose Vol. 14) is a scavenger. The artist sources a wide variety of natural and reclaimed materials — from moss and hair to styrofoam and plastic bags — for his miniature sculptures. Each of Euclide’s pieces is a tiny oasis with an artfully laid out ecosystem that brims with lush flora. The artist recently created a new installation, Islands, for the upcoming group show “Cartographer’s Delite” at Hellion Gallery in Portland, OR. When viewed together, the individual islands invite the eye to bounce from one mass to the next to investigate these microcosms. Take a look at a sneak peek of Gregory Euclide’s new work after the jump and check out “Cartographer’s Delite” on November 7.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Gregory Euclide (featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 14) creates poetry from throw-away materials. Dyed hair, plastic bags, sage, foam and fishing line dance and swirl together with unusual harmony — despite their incongruousness, these materials fit together seamlessly in his diorama-like assemblages. Euclide’s delicate, three-dimensional works require the viewer to get up close and peer into the depth of these miniature oases. Quietly rebelling against a history of imperialistic landscape painting that stems from the idea of mastering nature, Euclide creates his artwork with a conservationist message in mind. Euclide will open a solo show featuring new landscape relief paintings and porcelain-coated steel specimens painted with Sumi ink at Martha Otero Gallery in Los Angeles on April 13. Take a look at our preview of the works in the show after the jump and see the exhibition on view April 13 – May 11.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Gregory Euclide (HF Vol.17) is an aficionado of non-traditional art materials. We were astounded by his ephemeral whiteboard artworks that he created on his short lunch breaks while on the job as a high school teacher (check it out here), so naturally his new solo show, “Observing only the ease of my own slipping toward your unknown,” opening September 15 at David B. Smith Gallery in Denver, CO, caught our attention. Read more and take a look at our preview after the jump.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While on the job as a high school teacher in Minnesota, artist Gregory Euclide (Hi-Fructose vol. 17) began creating ephemeral paintings on whiteboards during his 25-minute lunch periods as a way to push the boundaries of creativity in the classroom.The ongoing series of works, titled “Laid Down & Wiped Away,” features delicately rendered landscapes smudged with sweeping arcs and dotted with geometric forms. Euclide’s impressively resourceful works have now been documented as prints using Sumi ink on dry erase board, which David B. Smith Gallery in Denver has recently released along with portfolios chronicling the project. Take a look at some more images courtesy of Gregory Euclide and David B. Smith Gallery.