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The Murals and Paintings of Luca Ledda

Luca Ledda’s surreal works deal with both our conception of the world and our consumption of its resources. The Turin artist offers these scenes in murals and gallery work across the globe. Recent projects include pieces in Belgium, Mexico, Bosnia, and beyond.


Luca Ledda’s surreal works deal with both our conception of the world and our consumption of its resources. The Turin artist offers these scenes in murals and gallery work across the globe. Recent projects include pieces in Belgium, Mexico, Bosnia, and beyond.

The artist “reveals the bitter taste of today’s consumerist society, where overweight human characters resemble animals – mainly pigs, thus switching roles and becoming the meat they eat,” says the The Re:Art Project. “Naked outside and emptied of any human feeling or experience inside, these characters express the agony of nothingness, of direct confrontation with their dark selves, where good no longer has opportunities to grow.”

See more on Ledda’s Instagram page.

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