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The Riveting Murals of Shozy

Shozy's illusionary murals use subtle techniques that enhance the life of a work. For instance, with the pieces above, packing bikes into a “hole” in the structure, uses reflective chrome paint that will change hues with the sky of the day.

Shozy’s illusionary murals use subtle techniques that enhance the life of a work. For instance, with the pieces above, packing bikes into a “hole” in the structure, uses reflective chrome paint that will change hues with the sky of the day.

Treepack offers some insight into the Russian artist’s background: “In his early days, just like most of the artists that have started out on the streets, he managed not to get caught while bombing walls, trains and other exotic objects. After an acedemic study in Classic Arts, and making countless friends in the art scene (such as the artist duo Hoodo), he ventured out to the more professional scene and experimented more and more with various styles and concepts. Later on he put the focus on 3D and optical illusion art, as you can see in his portfolio.”

Find more on Shozy’s site.

 

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