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The Mixed-Media Work of Jay Torres

The illustrations and personal work of artist Jay Torres have a dark surrealist edge. The El Paso-raised artist, now based in Pasadena, moves between analogue and digital tools to craft his creations.

The illustrations and personal work of artist Jay Torres have a dark surrealist edge. The El Paso-raised artist, now based in Pasadena, moves between analogue and digital tools to craft his creations.

“The common themes of brightly colored figures in barren landscapes, nightmarish portraits, and Catholic iconographies all combine quiet and aloof dreaminess with political and literary discourse,” La Luz de Jesus has said of the artist. “There are certainly lurid themes at play in most of Jay’s work but never polemical. The abject here shape a uniquely hypnagogic and surreal aesthetic that is more welcoming than it is confrontational.”

See more on the artist’s site.

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