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Series Highlights Nairobi Motor Taxi Drivers

Photographer Jan Hoek collaborated with Ugandan-Kenyan fashion designer Bobbin Case on a project focused on the Boda Boda motor taxis roaming Nairobi. As the drivers crafted vibrant and accessorized bikes to stand out each other, the pair worked with a set of them to create attire to match. The result is the photo series “Boda Boda Madness.”

Photographer Jan Hoek collaborated with Ugandan-Kenyan fashion designer Bobbin Case on a project focused on the Boda Boda motor taxis roaming Nairobi. As the drivers crafted vibrant and accessorized bikes to stand out each other, the pair worked with a set of them to create attire to match. The result is the photo series “Boda Boda Madness.”

“We selected seven Boda Boda drivers with the most awesome bikes and sat down with each of them to create brand new outfits to complete the characters,” Hoek says. “I photographed the Boda Boda drivers with their new looks in the style of real life action figures in front of Nairobi landscapes. The nice thing is that because of their new outfits their income went up, so they really kept on using their costumes. Maybe if you by chance visit Nairobi one of them will be your taxi guy.”

See more on Hoek’s site.

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