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The Unsettling Sculptures of KT Beans

In the hands of KT Beans, a seashell takes on unsettling qualities. The sculptor says she creates "oddities for humans of the future”: Teeth, eyes, and other human body parts and organs emerge out of unexpected places.

In the hands of KT Beans, a seashell takes on unsettling qualities. The sculptor says she creates “oddities for humans of the future”: Teeth, eyes, and other human body parts and organs emerge out of unexpected places.

“During her travels, over the years, she has become an avid collector of peculiar trinkets and artifacts which now serve as inspiration for her work,” her site says. “Combining her fascination with strange objects from another time and her desire to create pieces inspired by science and nature led to the body of work, Beans of John. On top of making unsettling objects made up of teeth, shells, eggs, eyes, and human hair, Kelley is also a practicing illustrator, mixed media artist, and taxidermist.”

See more of her work on her site.

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