Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Hirofumi Fujiwara’s ‘Utopian’ Sculptures

Hirofumi Fujiwara’s isolated sculptures are called Utopians, each person actually an amalgamation of features and cultures. Many of these characters, said to be from a parallel world, are presented inside of barriers as they “bear witness.”

Hirofumi Fujiwara’s isolated sculptures are called Utopians, each person actually an amalgamation of features and cultures. Many of these characters, said to be from a parallel world, are presented inside of barriers as they “bear witness.”

“His human sculptures, modelled from clay and plastic, stand, sit or lie in the exhibition space, reposing, transparent walls are surrounding their fragile bodies,” Galerie Burster says of the artist. “Fujiwara’s Utopians bear witness to a romantic longing for the unreachable, with a contemplative view towards the indefinite. Oscillating between the two worlds, Fujiwara’s sculptures bear references from the Japanese as well as the European Western culture. They seem youthful and yet ageless, androgynous and detached from all stereotypes – isolated from this world, yet resting in the very moment, anchored in pure just-being.”

See more on the sculptor’s site.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Sasha Gordon's vivid oil paintings feature touches of the surreal, exploring themes such as mental illness and sexuality. The artist, currently a student at the Rhode Island School of Design, has moved from intimate, realistic portraits to more conceptual, perspective shifting work recently. Works such as "I Left The Night The Dummy Crashed The Gordon's Volvo" offer seemingly personal narratives with several elements to unpack.
Hugh Hayden shapes wood, sourced from Christmas trees, exotic timbers, or other unexpected objects, into cerebral recreations of everyday objects. He recently showed recent work at C L E A R I N G’s Brussels gallery, pulling from spiritual, historical, and other aspects of the city to craft the body of work shown. The artist often injects his own personal history into his work, whether in the subject depicted or in the very wood harvested and formed.
With "Louise Bourgeois in the Rijksmuseum Gardens," the Amsterdam museum offers the first major exhibition to focus solely on the beloved artist’s outdoor sculptures. More than half a century is represented in these works, which include her famed, enormous spiders and other unsettling metal forms. Works include “The Blind Leading the Blind” and “Crouching Spider,” both existing on opposite ends of her career.
New Jersey-based sculptor Jedediah Morfit uses a bas-relief process that resembles ancient techniques, yet implement modern materials like urethane plastic. These flattened sculptures appear as both two- and three-dimensional. In a statement, the artist explains his influences:

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List