The Pop Culture-Infused Paintings of Dave Pollot

by Andy SmithPosted on

Dave Pollot revitalizes thrift store paintings with surreal or pop culture-centered flourishes. The artist recently painted giant banana duct taped to an existing mountainous backdrop for a piece auctioned for charity. The reason: Pollot says these conversations “can happen while people have little or nothing to eat.”

View this post on Instagram

SOLD! Thank you so much everyone!! Special thank you to the winning bid @christymack!!! AN AUCTION FOR CHARITY: Contemporary art can be, well, interesting (I’m sure your feed is already full of duct tape and bananas by now). What’s even more ridiculous is that these things can happen while people have little or nothing to eat. So here’s what I’m going to do – this ridiculous painting of a giant banana duct taped to a mountain measures 29×41”. I’m auctioning it off here and donating 90% of the proceeds to The Hunger Project. Serious bids can be made via comments (no reserve) and after 72 hours, the comment with the highest bid wins. (If you’d like to remain anonymous, dm your bid). I’ll pay for shipping anywhere in the continental US (if you’re an international buyer interested in bidding, DM me for shipping rates). It may not be $120,000, but every bit helps… – – #banana #ducttape #artbasel #baselbanana #artmiami #artbasel2019 #contemporaryart #artauction #auction #charity #thehungerproject #endhunger #oilpainting #arte #modernart #bananaart #contemporary_art #contemporarypainting #painting #art #modernart #artforcharity #charityevent #instaarte #hunger #endhunger #fighthunger #bananas #modernart

A post shared by Dave Pollot Art (@davepollotart) on

“I’ve always loved the idea that art is deeply personal,” the artist says. “I’m telling my own story with each piece, but every one is a little bit like a mirror, reflecting it’s meaning back to the viewer through his or her individual perception. More generally speaking however, there are a number of recurring questions and ideas that my work often deals with. I think that my body of work has challenged the idea that any one piece of artwork is without a place, especially if it can be retrofitted to reflect a more culturally relevant set of ideas. It’s also questioned the idea of who (generationally and otherwise) can claim ownership of the pop culture of a given time period – it’s sought to introduce a younger audience to older artistic styles, and a potentially older audience to a broader set of pop culture.”

See more of Pollot’s work on his site.

https://www.instagram.com/p/B5sQ20mlmC5/

View this post on Instagram

What would you call this? #breakfast #painting

A post shared by Dave Pollot Art (@davepollotart) on

Comments are closed.