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The Mythical Art of Curiot Tlalpazotl

Mexico City artist Curiot Tlalpazotl's mythical creations call upon cultural iconography and traditional craftmaking. In recent years, the artist's work has ranged from gallery paintings to massive installations and mural work. Much of it points to Mexican culture, which the artist said he reconnected with upon moving back after living in the States. Curiot was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 29.

Mexico City artist Curiot Tlalpazotl’s mythical creations call upon cultural iconography and traditional craftmaking. In recent years, the artist’s work has ranged from gallery paintings to massive installations and mural work. Much of it points to Mexican culture, which the artist said he reconnected with upon moving back after living in the States. Curiot was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 29.

Curiot’s colorful paintings, featuring mythical half-animal half-human figures and scenes, which allude to Mexican traditions (geometric designs, Day of the Dead styles, myths and legends, tribal elements), are rendered in precise detail with a mixture of highly vibrant yet complementary colors,” Thinkspace says of the artist.

Find more on Curiot’s site.


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