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The Dystopic Visions of CrocodilePOWER

CrocodilePOWER is a Moscow-based duo who craft dystopic yet vibrant installations, sculptures, and paintings. Consisting of artists Peter Goloshchapov and Oksana Simatova, the pair works in materials like fiberglass, porcelain, wood, moss, iron, and more. See some of their recent, startling visions below.

CrocodilePOWER is a Moscow-based duo who craft dystopic yet vibrant installations, sculptures, and paintings. Consisting of artists Peter Goloshchapov and Oksana Simatova, the pair works in materials like fiberglass, porcelain, wood, moss, iron, and more. See some of their recent, startling visions below.

“We perceive contemporary reality as a moveable, flexible space in which the past, present and future simultaneously exist and mix,” the duo says. “We are interested in a process, which excites us with its unpredictability, in which a person simultaneously takes the role of the creator and the laboratory mouse. Creativity becomes a game in which each next step brings us closer to the limits of conventional everyday life.”

See more from the duo on their site.

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