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Nikoo Bafti Reimagines Mother Nature in Illustrations

British-Iranian artist Nikoo Bafti crafts vibrant scenes that represent Mother Nature, pulling inspiration from varying mythologies. The artist's background includes studies in illustration, with time spent animation development at Disney Channels in London before she embarked on a career in personal and freelance work.

British-Iranian artist Nikoo Bafti crafts vibrant scenes that represent Mother Nature, pulling inspiration from varying mythologies. The artist’s background includes studies in illustration, with time spent animation development at Disney Channels in London before she embarked on a career in personal and freelance work.

“Nikoo’s work takes a look behind a thinning veil to an increasingly forgotten realm of deities, spirits and magic; exploring a playful side of dark mysticism and arcane ritual, conjured through her intensely saturated palettes and delicate, emblematic markings.”

Find more of the artist’s work on her site.

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