Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The Recent Paintings of Allison Zuckerman

Painter Allison Zuckerman’s work pulls from the past and digital present of art history to craft amalgamated depictions of women. She first designs her works digitally, then prints them on the canvas before applying paint to the creation. This year has brought multiple museum exhibitions for the artist, including stints at Akron Art Museum and Herziliya Museum and the University of Florida.

Painter Allison Zuckerman’s work pulls from the past and digital present of art history to craft amalgamated depictions of women. She first designs her works digitally, then prints them on the canvas before applying paint to the creation. This year has brought multiple museum exhibitions for the artist, including stints at Akron Art Museum and Herziliya Museum and the University of Florida.

“A Picasso head, Lucas Cranach torso, Richard Prince foot, Cezanne fruit, Lichtenstein paint brushes and Disney bluebirds comingle to create a grotesque, unapologetic encapsulation of the absurdity with which female figures have been depicted throughout art history.” Akron Art Museum says. “But Zuckerman is not just looking backward. She is proposing a way forward that is more honest, more embracing of the plurality of women’s identities. She states that her work represents a “marginalized perspective that’s been cast aside—one that’s emotional, unsure and vulnerable yet powerful in the conviction that [they] belong in the world.”

See more on her site.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Zin Lim paints sculpted bodies and faces with twinkling eyes before wiping them away with textured paint strokes. While the San Francisco-based artist began his career painting classical nude figures, his work has grown increasingly abstract over the years. Lim leaves just enough figurative details in each piece to give viewers a relatable entry point into the image. The human characters' presence guides us through the expressionistic markings the dominate the rest of the canvas.
James Guppy’s recent acrylic paintings on fabric, juxtaposing floral arrangements and contemporary businessmen, play with “the history of paint and value.” The artist showed his recent body of work in a run at Jan Murphy Gallery, titled "The Venal Garden." Though absurdist initially in appearance, the works have a specific historical consideration.
People packed on train platforms and congregated in public spaces - these images that are so familiar to the city dweller are the inspiration behind Lu Chao’s surreal oil paintings. The artist references the detailed, expressive brushstrokes of classical Chinese painting, applied to a contemporary subject matter, to provide an honest reflection of his personal experiences with living in some of the world's most populated cities.
Kazuki Takamatsu (HF Vol. 33 cover artist) paints layers of translucent, white gouache that appear to float over his matte, black backgrounds. His hologram-like, female characters look digitized, though they're executed entirely by hand. That's because the artist turns to depth mapping software for inspiration for his images and painstakingly renders his figures as if they were parceled into pixels. For his upcoming solo show "Even a Doll Can Do It," Takamatsu presents a new series of paintings centered around ghostly depictions of nymph-like girls floating in cyberspace. The exhibition opens February 14 at Dorothy Circus Gallery in Rome and will be on view through April 4.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List