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Kitt Bennett Crafts Record-Breaking ‘Gif-iti’

Kitt Bennett's "aerial mural work" was recently combined with satellite technology to craft the world's most massive independently created piece of "gif-iti" (or GIF-style graffiti) on 96,875-square-feet of waterfront space in Australia. The work, crafted by Bennett alongside collective Juddy Roller, features 10 figures that craft a "moving" scene when viewed as such below. Bennett was last featured on our site here.

Kitt Bennett’s “aerial mural work” was recently combined with satellite technology to craft the world’s most massive independently created piece of “gif-iti” (or GIF-style graffiti) on 96,875-square-feet of waterfront space in Australia. The work, crafted by Bennett alongside collective Juddy Roller, features 10 figures that craft a “moving” scene when viewed as such below. Bennett was last featured on our site here.

“Inhabiting a colossal 9000 sqm of disused waterfront ground space at Port Melbourne’s Fisherman’s Wharf precinct, the project took Bennett 30 days to complete; using 700 litres of paint to compose the work which comprises a series of 10 individual 30-metre-long figures … ,” Common State says. “The size and form of this mural is unprecedented – four times the size of the previous holder of the title, (which clocks in at 27 storeys high) this mural has taken over the equivalent of 90 floors-worth of ground space.”

Read more about Bennett and Juddy Roller here and here.

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