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Kensuke Koike’s Surreal Alterations of Vintage Imagery

In Kensuke Koike’s ongoing “Single Image Processing” series, the artist alters vintage photographs and postcards with both humorous and surreal results. With just a pair of scissors, the artist is able to remix and recontextualize imagery that is otherwise ordinary or nostalgia-fueled.

In Kensuke Koike’s ongoing “Single Image Processing” series, the artist alters vintage photographs and postcards with both humorous and surreal results. With just a pair of scissors, the artist is able to remix and recontextualize imagery that is otherwise ordinary or nostalgia-fueled.

“He has one rule for making this work: nothing can be removed and nothing can be added,” Postmasters Gallery says of the artist. “One photograph, one source from which to construct new work and a new meaning. The rigor and discipline of this approach unlocks unexpected richness in images that might otherwise be overlooked as familiar, or even dismissed as banal. His is a conceptual exercise of constraint and deceptive simplicity that tests and reveals how much may be achieved with very little.”

Find more of his work on his site.

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