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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The Figurative Paintings of Arcmanoro Niles

In his depictions of the everyday, Arcmanoro Niles recalls traditional figurative painting while subverting in his choice of hues and glitter—and also introducing strange characters into the scenes dubbed "seekers." These characters offer new insight and disruption to the people he pulls from his own life.

In his depictions of the everyday, Arcmanoro Niles recalls traditional figurative painting while subverting in his choice of hues and glitter—and also introducing strange characters into the scenes dubbed “seekers.” These characters offer new insight and disruption to the people he pulls from his own life.

“The seekers are impulsive actors, in pursuit of immediate pleasure with no concern for consequence,” Rachel Uffner Gallery says. “Often rendered in violent, self-destructive, or sexual gestures, the seekers foil the slow contemplation and seriousness of Niles’ human subjects. Ultimately interested in personal journeys, Niles questions how and why people become the way they are. The narratives that play out here examine coping mechanisms and how people do the best they can with the tools and outlets available to them at different stages in life.”

Find more on the artist’s site.

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