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Andrea Salvatori Examines Art History Through Humorous Sculptures

Andrea Salvatori subverts art-historical themes and motifs in his sculptures, reimagining the interior of Renaissance-style figures or unsettling forms emerging from pottery. He moves between traditional and digital means to execute these works.

Andrea Salvatori subverts art-historical themes and motifs in his sculptures, reimagining the interior of Renaissance-style figures or unsettling forms emerging from pottery. He moves between traditional and digital means to execute these works.

MADEINBRITALY Art Gallery says the artist makes “ironic and witty sculptures, sometimes involving a diverse selection of found objects, such as Murano glass vases, Meissen porcelain miniatures or Ginori period ceramics sourced in flea markets around Europe. Salvatori’s works often begin with these items and add an element created by the artist, generating an unexpected semantic shift. The result is unique, encompassing pop culture and kitsch aesthetics: a witty and effective way to turn reality upside-down and at the same time a powerful combination of exquisite craftsmanship and genuine irony.”

Find more on the artist’s Instagram page.

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