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Jaén Cartonería’s Massive Día de Muertos Sculptures

To mark the Mexican holiday of Día de Muertos, artist Raymundo Medina of the Jaén Cartonería family collective dreamed up enormous skeletons that appear to be emerging from the pavement. The massive cardboard works can be found in Santa Cecilia Tláhuac, Mexico. The artist often works with Yaocalli Indians in erecting these creations, Miguel Angel Luna says. The annual holiday runs through tomorrow.

To mark the Mexican holiday of Día de Muertos, artist Raymundo Medina of the Jaén Cartonería family collective dreamed up enormous skeletons that appear to be emerging from the pavement. The massive cardboard works can be found in Santa Cecilia Tláhuac, Mexico. The artist often works with Yaocalli Indians in erecting these creations, Miguel Angel Luna says. The annual holiday runs through tomorrow.

Find more of the collective’s work on their Facebook page.

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