Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The Recent Wax Sculptures of Rebecca Stevenson

The wax sculptures of Rebecca Stevenson reference both Dutch still-life painting and the creatures and themes of myth. Her recent work continues to investigate themes of life, death, and nature. In her use of both wax and polyester resin, the textures can appear akin to centuries-old oil paintings, with her forms melding together.

The wax sculptures of Rebecca Stevenson reference both Dutch still-life painting and the creatures and themes of myth. Her recent work continues to investigate themes of life, death, and nature. In her use of both wax and polyester resin, the textures can appear akin to centuries-old oil paintings, with her forms melding together.

“Rebecca’s method involves casting her animal sculptures in layers of resin and wax, and then incising them like a surgeon, peeling each layer back to create a cavity to host her cornucopia,” says James Freeman Gallery. “In contrast to the sombreness of the 17th century, her wax modelling is lush and bright, the sugarfrost coating almost sickly sweet. In her bronzes she takes the kind of curlicues that were thought to enchant the viewer and prompt awe, and replaces what should be cherubs with the heads of rabbits and game. The result is an investigation of the Baroque obsession with mortality, reinterpreted for the 21st century.”

Find more of her work on her site and the gallery’s page.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Attention all artists! In partnership with our friends at Squarespace, Hi-Fructose is highlighting five artists who are currently using Squarespace for their website or portfolio. This week's feature is blown-glass sculptor Etai Rahmil, who creates colorful and fanciful trumpets out of his studio in Berkley, California. Using traditional glass blowing techniques and specializing in multi-color, Rahmil's trumpets pay homage to his contemporary inspirations. 
Wesley Wright’s ceramic sculptures explore our relationship to the natural world, in both its corruption and beauty. In his “Primates" series, in specific, the artist’s talents knack for surprising details in the contours of his subjects shines. The artist, based in Northern California, works primarily in stoneware clay.
In some strange future, Aggie Zed’s “Scrap Floats” take part in a procession of the eerie and the familiar. These parade floats are comprised of animals, human parts, mechanized gadgetry, and, well, other scraps. The mixed-media sculptures currently haunt the Rivermont Studio in Lynchburg, Virginia, where the show "ta da!" pairs Zed's pieces with work from book artist Ginna Cullen.
Cristina Córdova’s stirring ceramic sculptures explore the iconography of differing cultures and social ideas while tethering all of humankind. At varying scales, these pieces are striking in their confrontations with the viewers, recalling both the familiar and a broad spirituality in their execution. Each of the figurative pieces contain multiple explorations, the artist says.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List