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The Stirring Sculptures of Nathan French

Nathan French, a fashion designer-turned-fine artist, crafts captivating and unsettling sculptures crystals, feathers, wax, and other unexpected materials. The artist, who appears in the upcoming Park Park Studios group show "Wasteland,” had previously created wearable art in his previous career. And in fine art, threads from that training endure.

Nathan French, a fashion designer-turned-fine artist, crafts captivating and unsettling sculptures crystals, feathers, wax, and other unexpected materials. The artist, who appears in the upcoming Park Park Studios group show “Wasteland,” had previously created wearable art in his previous career. And in fine art, threads from that training endure.

“Fascinated by the human body, he decided to create it rather than dress it. His life-size sculptures and busts are portraits of a regurgitated history seen in a contemporary context, whether personal or political,” Park Park says. “His pieces are a juxtaposition of aesthetics and concepts. His themes are a melange of identity, sexuality and adversity. He aims to show the beauty of the misrepresented and marginalized people in society.”

Find more of his work on his site.

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