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The Costumes and Prints of Ellis Tolsma

Ellis Tolsma’s vibrant costumes recall the famous parties of Germany's Bauhaus school in the 1920s. Like her prints and sculptures, Tolsma has a knack for integrating geometric forms into striking creations. The illustrator "and maker" hails from the Netherlands.

Ellis Tolsma’s vibrant costumes recall the famous parties of Germany’s Bauhaus school in the 1920s. Like her prints and sculptures, Tolsma has a knack for integrating geometric forms into striking creations. The illustrator “and maker” hails from the Netherlands.

“Because in my opinion we often take things just a little too seriously, I want to bring color and madness back to the world with my work,” the artist has said. “When you are young you often believe in a kind of magical world that, as soon as you enter puberty, ceases to exist. From that moment you seem to step into a kind of gray adult world, where daydreaming and playing is out of the question. With my work I try to stir up this magical world a little bit.”

See more of her work on her site and some of her non-costume work below.

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