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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The Paper Sculptures of Rogan Brown

Rogan Brown’s paper sculptures depict complex scientific processes and organisms. The artist, as what he calls a "non-scientist" or “outsider,” attempts to reconcile and recreate the life of bacteria, the effects of quantum physics, and other true-to-life research, through his own singular creative sensibility.

Rogan Brown’s paper sculptures depict complex scientific processes and organisms. The artist, as what he calls a “non-scientist” or “outsider,” attempts to reconcile and recreate the life of bacteria, the effects of quantum physics, and other true-to-life research, through his own singular creative sensibility.

“My choice of paper cutting as a vehicle for this exploration of our changing perception of nature is based on its accessibility and simplicity as a medium,” the artist says. “The transformation of a banal, quotidian material into something visually extraordinary parallels and echoes the radical changes in our vision of the familiar world that science engenders. But a recurrent theme in my work is the limitations of science when confronted by the vast scale and complexity of nature. Science’s goal of containing and defining nature is constantly subverted and fractured by the sheer volume and variety of data that needs to be observed, analysed and classified. This is figured in the excessive detail that characterizes my work as I attempt to overwhelm the eye through the scale and volume of what I depict.”

See more of his work on his site.

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