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Ken Flewellyn Returns to Thinkspace With ‘Shine’

With "Shine," painter Ken Flewellyn further explores the golden age of hip-hop and intersecting cultures. The show, currently running at Thinkspace Projects in Culver City, offers a set of new works, including a collaboration with artist Brian Viveros. Flewellyn was recently featured in print with Hi-Fructose Vol. 47.

With “Shine,” painter Ken Flewellyn further explores the golden age of hip-hop and intersecting cultures. The show, currently running at Thinkspace Projects in Culver City, offers a set of new works, including a collaboration with artist Brian Viveros. Flewellyn was recently featured in print with Hi-Fructose Vol. 47.

“The juxtaposition of formal cultural garb and pop cultural accoutrements keeps the work fascinating,” the gallery says. “These tightly cropped compositions are always informed by the presence of Hip Hop imagery, whether in the form of boom boxes, tapes, gold chains or typography. Playful and energized with tactility and detail, they’re both sensual and contemporary – solemn and light. Each painting featured in Shine is adorned with the sumptuousness of gold and includes hidden Hip Hop references to its golden age throughout, all as an ode to the genre that has never lost its shine.”

“Shine” runs through Nov. 2. See more on the gallery’s site and Flewellyn’s own page.

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