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Serge Gay Jr. Offers Ode to Palm Springs

Serge Gay Jr. offers a love letter to resort city Palm Springs in his new show, "P.S. I Love You," at Voss Gallery. Bathed in sunshine and a Mid-Century Modern sensibility, the works are a stirring blend of acrylics and graphite. “Popularized in the 1930s as a fashionable getaway for the Hollywood elite, the human-built utopia has become a haven for creatives lured to the vast desert as an artistic escape and source for inspiration,” the gallery says. The show, which begins on Oct. 11, runs through Nov. 2 at the San Francisco space.

Serge Gay Jr. offers a love letter to resort city Palm Springs in his new show, “P.S. I Love You,” at Voss Gallery. Bathed in sunshine and a Mid-Century Modern sensibility, the works are a stirring blend of acrylics and graphite. “Popularized in the 1930s as a fashionable getaway for the Hollywood elite, the human-built utopia has become a haven for creatives lured to the vast desert as an artistic escape and source for inspiration,” the gallery says. The show, which begins on Oct. 11, runs through Nov. 2 at the San Francisco space.

“Palm Springs inspires me to be creative in every way,” Gay says. “In all its glory, I want to celebrate this beautiful place that I love. This is the story of how the city–which I consider to be a work of art and world treasure–makes me feel.”

See more from the artist on Voss Gallery’s page and Gay’s own site.

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