Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The Painted Visions of Peter Gric

Austrian painter Peter Gric offers surreal visions of the future, with writhing biomechanical creatures and notes from ancient religious art coursing throughout his paintings. Gric’s work also includes sculpture, bringing his metallic forms to life. Though often constructed in acrylics, gold leaf, and other traditional paints, Gric’s work begins as digital sketches:

Austrian painter Peter Gric offers surreal visions of the future, with writhing biomechanical creatures and notes from ancient religious art coursing throughout his paintings. Gric’s work also includes sculpture, bringing his metallic forms to life. Though often constructed in acrylics, gold leaf, and other traditional paints, Gric’s work begins as digital sketches:

“In the early nineties Peter Gric started to discover the possibilities of computer graphics for his paintings,” a statement says. “From then on his organic-surreal visual imagery was enriched by complex architectural structures and artefacts. In place of using pencil and sketchbook he began to design his compositions with a 3D visualization software, he started to transfer the virtual reality into painting and consequently found within this fusion to his very unique and distinctive style.”

See more of Gric’s work on his site.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Kara Walker's known for her frank and varied explorations of race, gender, violence, and sexuality. A controversial new collection of work, now at Sikkema Jenkins & Co. in New York City, tackles today’s white supremacy and our country’s history, now within the Trump era.
Redd Walitzki's fantastical paintings offers a vision of people fully engrossed into the natural world, with magical implications. In a show at Haven Gallery, "The Midsommar Dream," the artist calls upon ancient folktales and dreamlike visions. Walitzki was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.
There's something intrinsically horrifying about seeing the familiar mutated, spliced and perverted. Caitlin Hackett, Robert Bowen and Dave Correia's work certainly has this shock factor in common. The three artists, who are showing together in "Dark Matters" at San Francisco's Bash Contemporary on May 31, look to nature as their inspiration. But rather than depicting butterflies and daisies, their work collectively alludes to a world that's been polluted, mined, stripped of its forests and impregnated with nuclear waste.
The work of Pakistan-born, Australia-based artist Khadim Ali explores history, traditional art practices, and the artist’s own identity. Much of his work has been influenced by the 10th-century epic poem “Shahnama/The Book of Kings,” and is often expressed in classical miniatures, murals and calligraphy.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List