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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The Drawings and Murals of Lucas Lasnier

In the work of Lucas Lasnier, also known as PARBO, geometric forms collide with and infiltrate our reality. Whether adorning a wall or a page, Lasnier’s penchants for both the abstract and the realistic are at play. And Lasnier’s background in urban art comes through even in his more commercial ventures.

In the work of Lucas Lasnier, also known as PARBO, geometric forms collide with and infiltrate our reality. Whether adorning a wall or a page, Lasnier’s penchants for both the abstract and the realistic are at play. And Lasnier’s background in urban art comes through even in his more commercial ventures.

“He is a member of a generation of artists who have taken their talents in art and design environments beyond traditional galleries and commercial contexts,” his site says. “He threw paint on the street in 2001, experimenting first with letters and stencil graffiti. Being part of the pioneers in the local street art movement. Its performance is expressed in Buenos Aires and in different cities of Latin America and Europe.”

Find more on the artist’s Instagram page.

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