Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

David Jien Returns With ‘All Is Not Lost’

Rendered in colored pencil and graphite, the new works of David Jien expand his wild worlds in a show at Richard Heller Gallery. "All Is Not Lost," running through Nov. 2 at the Santa Monica space, moves between his strange scenes and shelves of curiosities. Jien was last featured on our site here.

Rendered in colored pencil and graphite, the new works of David Jien expand his wild worlds in a show at Richard Heller Gallery. “All Is Not Lost,” running through Nov. 2 at the Santa Monica space, moves between his strange scenes and shelves of curiosities. Jien was last featured on our site here.

“This recent body of work is an expansion of the overarching narrative of Jien’s mythology within the context of his previous two exhibitions with the gallery,” the gallery says. “The drawings in the show push the storyline forward, while at the same time shed light onto the origins and backgrounds of certain characters. Dots that connect with other dots that reveal more dots within Jien’s meta-verse. As with Jien’s previous work, the drawings are delicately and meticulously rendered with color pencils and graphite.”

See more works on the gallery’s page and Jien’s website.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
If you asked Korean artist Yeom Jihee to describe her art in one word, it would be "hysteria". Her monochromatic mixed media drawings feature a disorderly assemblage of figures and impossible objects, set in environments where the physical plane extends into a blank space of nothingness. Jihee uses these explorations of infinity, reflection, symmetry, and perspective to express her feelings of emotional conflict, or in her words, "a loss of self-control due to overwhelming fear."
Illustrator Kima Lenaghan's series “Homo Conscius” imagines an evolved place "where genuine and profound consciousness is found." The artist’s solitary drawings offer both tangible and dreamlike elements, exaggerating aspects of nature and extracting them in sparse narratives. The "Stoned Ape Hypothesis" from ethnobotanist Terrance McKenna, theorizing that early humans evolved due to psychedelic mushrooms, serves as inspiration here.
Micha Huigen’s illustrations dissect and reassemble everyday objects into surreal machines. The artist’s work, both in personal and commissioned forms, are marked by elegant and bold linework. Huigen has crafted album art, music videos, magazines, and other editorial work.
Self-taught artist Christo Dagorov creates multi-layered drawings in which scenes appear to melt into one another. In his "Skylines" series, translucent urban landscapes manifest in spirit-like ways over placid beach scenes. The interplay between nature and urbanity asks viewers to image a place's current state and what could have been. Dagorov's use of acute gradients gives his work a nearly sculptural level of depth. His series of monochromatic drawings titled "Lips" also melds various images, this time constructing surreal, hellish visions in the shape of human mouths.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List