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En Iwamura Explores ‘Ma’ in Recent Show

In En Iwamura’s recent show at Ross+Kramer Gallery's East Hampton venue, the artist explores the concept of “Ma,” a philosophical Japanese concept focusing on spatial awareness between entities. His vibrant creations, with their distinct structure and playfulness, give viewers the chance to consider Ma with his creatures.

In En Iwamura’s recent show at Ross+Kramer Gallery’s East Hampton venue, the artist explores the concept of “Ma,” a philosophical Japanese concept focusing on spatial awareness between entities. His vibrant creations, with their distinct structure and playfulness, give viewers the chance to consider Ma with his creatures.

“En Iwamura’s current research investigates how he can influence and alter the experience of viewers who occupy space with his installation artworks,” the gallery says. “When Iwamura describes the space and scale in his works, he references the Japanese philosophy of Ma. Ma implies meanings of distance, moment, space, relationship, and more. People constantly read and measure different Ma between themselves, and finding the proper or comfortable Ma between people or places can provide a specific relationship at a given moment.”

See more works from the show on the gallery’s site and Iwamura’s page here.

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