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The Murals of Juanjo Surace

Juanjo Surace’s expertise in animation and character design comes through the murals he crafts on walls across the globe. His surreal work often confronts themes from our own reality, from death and solitude to technology and consumption. The above work, "The Trip," was painted over 14 days in Vinaròs.

Juanjo Surace’s expertise in animation and character design comes through the murals he crafts on walls across the globe. His surreal work often confronts themes from our own reality, from death and solitude to technology and consumption. The above work, “The Trip,” was painted over 14 days in Vinaròs.

“The Argentinian artist is a master of 3D animation and illustration since he came to live in Barcelona in 1998,” Spain’s Guzzo says. “His works on canvas and murals are known for their intense imagination, black humor and ironic criticism. Inspired by pop surrealist movement, he never stops questioning our human condition in a satiric way.”

See more of Surace’s work on his Instagram page.

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