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The Hyperrealistic Sculptures of Aspencrow

Aspencrow's hyperrealistic figurative sculptures blend the provocative with pop. Blending materials like resin, fiberglass, and silicone, his works serve as both admiring and wry portraits. The artist was born in Lithuania and moved to England to attend Birmingham City University, School of Art.

Aspencrow’s hyperrealistic figurative sculptures blend the provocative with pop. Blending materials like resin, fiberglass, and silicone, his works serve as both admiring and wry portraits. The artist was born in Lithuania and moved to England to attend Birmingham City University, School of Art.

“This change he coins as ‘moving forward, both encompassing the move to England and a movement within my art process,’” JD Malat Gallery says. “The transfer to England was a pivotal point in both his personal and artistic education as he remarks that once in Birmingham he gained “freedom in thinking and action as an artist”. ASPENCROW is known for his life-sized sculptures, but his practice is deeply rooted in his initial interest in painting realism.”

See more of the artist’s work on his website.

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