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The Installations and Performance Art of Hiromi Tango

Hiromi Tango textile work functions as both static, otherworldly growths in galleries across the globe and elements activated through performance art. Yet, much of the artist’s work is also about connecting directly with the artist, via performances that activate her writhing forms. Recent work has also taken her vision outside of traditional spaces.

Hiromi Tango textile work functions as both static, otherworldly growths in galleries across the globe and elements activated through performance art. Yet, much of the artist’s work is also about connecting directly with the artist, via performances that activate her writhing forms. Recent work has also taken her vision outside of traditional spaces.

https://www.instagram.com/p/B0QYQLkggF4/

“Over recent years, her practice has become increasingly focused on exploring neuroscientific concepts through arts engagement, posing questions around neuroplasticity, empathy and epigenetics in her quest to effect healing and well-being through arts,” a statement says. “Often using metaphors from nature to represent brain processes, her works develop through a combination of research, reflection and ritual. Whilst Tango’s practice is grounded in a fascination with scientific discovery, she remains steadfast in her role as an artist being one of constant questioning and blurring boundaries, the ability to ask ‘what if?’ without the scientific proof.”

Find more of her installations on her site.

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