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The Murals of PixelPancho

Italian artist PixelPancho is known for a fascination with robots, yet his massive murals go beyond contemplations on technology and into metaphysical territory. His work, found on walls across the world, offer an interconnected narrative from piece to piece, gradually unfolding the painter's broad examination of what it means to be human.

Italian artist PixelPancho is known for a fascination with robots, yet his massive murals go beyond contemplations on technology and into metaphysical territory. His work, found on walls across the world, offer an interconnected narrative from piece to piece, gradually unfolding the painter’s broad examination of what it means to be human.

“The narrative in Pixelpancho’s work is driven by a forgotten world that sits under a blanket of dust,” his site says. “In it, broken and dented robots are found decaying into the ground, their iron and rusted copper bodies falling and laying as if discarded into oblivion. Although the scale of his work ranges, the surreal realm is a constant thread, piercing through contemporary and historical references that add a sense relevance within our place and time. The strength of physical and gestural references that humanize these robots results in the artist’s unmistakable mark.”

Find more of the artist’s work on his site.

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