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The Graphite Drawings of Dasha Pliska

Dasha Pliska's pencil drawings carry drama and ghostly grace. The Ukraine illustrator works primarily in monochromatic modes, elegantly moving between skin tones and billowing forms moving across the page. And recent personal projects, such as "repletion," show the artist's knack for utilizing negative space.

Dasha Pliska’s pencil drawings carry drama and ghostly grace. The Ukraine illustrator works primarily in monochromatic modes, elegantly moving between skin tones and billowing forms moving across the page. And recent personal projects, such as “repletion,” show the artist’s knack for utilizing negative space.

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bvo-PRmARXY/

In much of her work, Pliska tends to balance realism, along with surreal flourishes. The artist has also created her own poster concepts for films like “Hereditary” (above) and “Phantom Thread.” See more of her personal work, including the series “obscurity,” “FLOWS,” and others, below.

Find more from the artist on her Facebook page.

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