Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Jamian Juliano-Villani’s Dark Humor Returns With ‘Let’s Kill Nicole’

Jamian Juliano-Villani, known for stirring acrylic paintings packed with dark humor and sprawling references, offers new works in a show at Massimo De Carlo London titled "Let's Kill Nicole." She offers both new paintings and sculptures in the display, which runs through Sept. 21. Juliano-Villani's work is known for pulling in a variety of familiar imagery from fashion, illustration, and other industries, with conversations emerging over what constitutes referencing versus appropriation. “Everything is a reference,” she’s insisted.

Jamian Juliano-Villani, known for stirring acrylic paintings packed with dark humor and sprawling references, offers new works in a show at Massimo De Carlo London titled “Let’s Kill Nicole.” She offers both new paintings and sculptures in the display, which runs through Sept. 21. Juliano-Villani’s work is known for pulling in a variety of familiar imagery from fashion, illustration, and other industries, with conversations emerging over what constitutes referencing versus appropriation. “Everything is a reference,” she’s insisted.

On the below work, in particular: “Overtaci, a deer-cum-human figure, finds its origin from the obsessive work of a Danish outsider artist, Ovartaci. Ovartaci spent majority of her life as a patient mainly hidden in the Risskov Psychiatric Hospital in Aarhus, Denmark. Juliano-Villani reimagines the artist’s muse as a teenage American lacrosse player framed by a parents’ camera lens. The stale obsessive humanoid is frozen in activity, with the athletic shorts rolled up all the way up.”

See more on the gallery’s site.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
The oil paintings of Liora Ostroff, with varying textures and contemporary imagery, call upon the history of the form. With her lush environments and occasionally morbid edges, she navigates humanity in both vulnerable and surreal terms.
VILE’s illusionary murals often use the artist’s own moniker as windows into fictional places, whether a continuation of the inhabited space or another dimension. Elsewhere, the artist presents figures that live along the contours of a room or outdoor locale. In recent years, he's participated in projects in Germany, Portugal, London, and beyond.
Russian-born artist Sergei Isupov investigates binaries in human relationships — male and female, good and evil, beautiful and grotesque. Using clay as both a material for three-dimensional expression and as a canvas for his illustrations, Isupov capitalizes on all properties of what he finds to be the most open medium. He sculpts human and animal figures, and then adds illustrations in glaze. The paintings diffuse into the clay’s surface, like tattoos on his sculptures’ skin. Taken together, the two- and three-dimensional elements of his work establish a compacted but powerful scene of emotions and narratives.
Giovanni Forlino’s vibrant paintings and drawings move between dreamlike scenes, grotesque characters, and wild creatures of the natural world. His surreal, monstrous subjects, in particular, fill the space as if they are on the cusp of breaking out of it.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List