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The Creatures of Claudio Romo

Though the creatures of Claudio Romo are bizarre and at times, frightening, the illustrator’s distinct linework gives each a certain elegance. The Chile-based artist has produced a number of books carrying his strange monsters and plantlife (among them, the beautifully titled “The Book of Imprudent Flora”). Through often carrying no specific timeline, his practice has also extended into the futuristic, as evidenced below.

Though the creatures of Claudio Romo are bizarre and at times, frightening, the illustrator’s distinct linework gives each a certain elegance. The Chile-based artist has produced a number of books carrying his strange monsters and plantlife (among them, the beautifully titled “The Book of Imprudent Flora”). Through often carrying no specific timeline, his practice has also extended into the futuristic, as evidenced below.

“[He] explores the secret meanderings of nature and of the human mind, taking us into a carnivalesque and at times sinister world that shows us how life feeds on anomalies and eccentricities, not on normality,” says publisher LIBRI.it “Drawing on mythological, alchemical, and science-fiction imagery, Romo reminds us of the ephemeral nature of reality, which is nothing but the product of fantasy.”

See more of his work on his Instagram account.

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