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Ukiyoemon Mitomoya Takes Ancient Approach Toward the Contemporary

Japanese artist Ukiyoemon Mitomoya continues the ukiyo-e tradition with contemporary and political reflections, his works commenting on anything from white-collar life in Japan to Brexit. The result moves between the humorous and satirical to the enlightening, offering a different scope and perspective on the issues of the day.

Japanese artist Ukiyoemon Mitomoya continues the ukiyo-e tradition with contemporary and political reflections, his works commenting on anything from white-collar life in Japan to Brexit. The result moves between the humorous and satirical to the enlightening, offering a different scope and perspective on the issues of the day.

“Most of his works are based on the various aspects of life and satirical events,” JPS Gallery says. “The series about office workers he created depict the bitterness the working class suffers in a humorous way. In addition to his focus on the art of painting, Ukiyoemon is also a famous designer who has worked with many world-renowned companies, including Paris Saint-Germain FC. He inherits the ukiyo-e culture by integrating it into modern life, making this traditional culture more interesting and easier to understand.”

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