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The Psychedelic Illustrations of Miki Kim

Miki Kim’s psychedelic and at times, humorous illustrations blend pop elements across cultures. The artist, who also works in the tattoo industry, creates her bold imagery with fluid linework and soft palettes, both underscoring her absorbing and psychedelic concepts. She has created tattoos and illustrations under the moniker Mick Hee over the past few years.

Miki Kim’s psychedelic and at times, humorous illustrations blend pop elements across cultures. The artist, who also works in the tattoo industry, creates her bold imagery with fluid linework and soft palettes, both underscoring her absorbing and psychedelic concepts. She has created tattoos and illustrations under the moniker Mick Hee over the past few years.

“I have been influenced by Japanese culture since I was a child,” the artist recently told Tattoodo. “Music, books and movies. I like the movies of Iwai Shunji and Wes Anderson, and I enjoy reading Murakami Haruki’s book, and I like psychedelic genre but I enjoy almost all the music. Music is the most important part of my paintings. As mentioned above, I like the paintings of Magritte and Dali, and I like the works of Japanese artists such as Nagai Hiroshi, Suzuki Eijin, and Sorayama Hajime.”

See more of Kim’s work below.

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bx3T9cnF1sO/

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bw_JQ-5Fmiz/

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