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The Figurative Paintings of Samara Shuter

Despite their headlessness, Samara Shuter’s figurative work teems with personality and vibrancy. The approach of blending realistic bodies with flat, graphical forms continues a thread recalling the likes of Kehinde Wiley and Jenny Morgan. Meanwhile, Shuter’s work carries its own bombastic quality and subtle, cerebral nature.

Despite their headlessness, Samara Shuter’s figurative work teems with personality and vibrancy. The approach of blending realistic bodies with flat, graphical forms continues a thread recalling the likes of Kehinde Wiley and Jenny Morgan. Meanwhile, Shuter’s work carries its own bombastic quality and subtle, cerebral nature.

https://www.instagram.com/p/ByQfUs3gqwR/

“Shuter allows her past experiences to inform her artwork: the bold colors and graphic patterns for which Shuter is renowned, are largely inspired by the artist’s family’s roots in the textile industry,” a statement says. “Her work is motivated by her explorations of fashion, symmetry and composition, with an ongoing analysis of ego, character, connection and a constant desire for self-expression. Shuter currently lives and works in Toronto.”

See more of her work below.

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