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The ‘Marquees Tropica’ Illustrations of Ardneks

In the series “Marquees Tropica,” illustrator Ardneks crafted works “reflecting different stages” of his personal life, with each completed with a single song on repeat. The result is a set of vibrant, wild works packed with details to decipher. The artist’s practice has included album covers for multiple acts, but this series takes a decidedly intimate slant, as compared to those pieces. The above work, titled "COASTAL JUiCEBOX" was made alongside the tune "風の回廊(コリドー)" by Tatsuro Yamashita.

In the series “Marquees Tropica,” illustrator Ardneks crafted works “reflecting different stages” of his personal life, with each completed with a single song on repeat. The result is a set of vibrant, wild works packed with details to decipher. The artist’s practice has included album covers for multiple acts, but this series takes a decidedly intimate slant, as compared to those pieces. The above work, titled “COASTAL JUiCEBOX” was made alongside the tune
“風の回廊(コリドー)” by Tatsuro Yamashita.


“CELESTiAL BROADCAST” (Song: The Jesus and Mary Chain — “Just Like Honey”)


“MOONAGE ODDiTY” (Song: David Bowie — “Space Oddity”)


“STRAWBERRY LETTER” (Song: Jacks — “時計をとめて”)


“SUNFLOWERMiLK ViBRATiONS” (Song: The Beach Boys — “Don’t Worry Baby”)

The artist says the moniker “Ardneks Paraiso Grafica” is an “illustration outlet that heavily hallmarks music while at the same time peels on the playful combination of cross-culture references, highly saturated colors, intergalactic deities, and dreamy tropicália.”


“FUTURE SHORES” (Song: Broadcast — “Illumination”)


“HYPERVENTILATION CHERRY” (Song: Beach House — “Space Song”)

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