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The Murals of Illustrator Gina Kiel

Gina Kiel’s vibrant murals are informed by the spaces and walls they inhabit across the globe. Her work has recently adorned spots in New Zealand, Hawaii, and Mexico.

Gina Kiel’s vibrant murals are informed by the spaces and walls they inhabit across the globe. Her work has recently adorned spots in New Zealand, Hawaii, and Mexico.

Kiel often shares background on the pieces, including the one at the top of the page: “Coral is commonly mistaken for rocks or plants and many of us are unaware that these delicate creatures, growing like little mothers providing a nursery for thousands of species of fish, are actually living creatures,” the artist said. “In my mural I have personified coral in the form of the face of Mother Nature, a relatable image for us humans, illustrating that coral is a living entity and to tread carefully in the water. Just like us, once it is gone, it is gone. A reminder to be careful not to stand on or touch her and not to use sunscreen in the ocean as it creates a barrier stopping nutrients from the sunlight reaching through the water to the coral.”

See more of her work below.

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