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Jana Euler’s Paintings Show ‘Great White Fear’

A terrifying force from the natural world comes into focus in Jana Euler's current show, “Great White Fear,” at Galerie Neu in Berlin. Running through May 30, this collection of the artist’s acrylic and oil paintings centered on sharks is both visceral and varied in approach.

A terrifying force from the natural world comes into focus in Jana Euler’s current show, “Great White Fear,” at Galerie Neu in Berlin. Running through May 30, this collection of the artist’s acrylic and oil paintings centered on sharks is both visceral and varied in approach.

A statement accompanying the show is near-poetic:
“Who is afraid of what, what is afraid of whom.
I think there is nothing in these paintings you would not see or miss, if left undescribed.
Besides maybe that it is like with the Mona Lisa, they look at you wherever you are in the room.”

See more works from the show below.

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