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Jeremy Cross Shows Sculptures, Paintings in New Show

The dark surrealist sculptures and paintings of Jeremy Cross return in a new show at Dark Art Emporium, titled "Speaking In Ghosts." Kicking off Saturday at the gallery, the recent works by the artist include his “Ghost Skull” series of busts.

The dark surrealist sculptures and paintings of Jeremy Cross return in a new show at Dark Art Emporium, titled “Speaking In Ghosts.” Kicking off Saturday at the gallery, the recent works by the artist include his “Ghost Skull” series of busts.

“Jeremy Cross has been showing his work professionally in galleries across the country and abroad for over 12 years,” the gallery says. “Racking up an impressive resume of gallery affiliations and shows. … Unapologetically self taught, but with a crafted skill that clearly shows his dedication and work ethic, Jeremy has created a style that is not only unique but immediately recognizable as his.”

See more work from the show below.

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