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The Cinematic Paintings of Xiao Wang

The lush paintings of Xiao Wang carry cerebral themes and unexpected hues. The tension conveyed in these works comes from both the artist’s rendering of each subject and the unexplained narratives contained within each. All of these aspects, along with his knack for realism, create a cinematic sensibility in Wang's paintings.

The lush paintings of Xiao Wang carry cerebral themes and unexpected hues. The tension conveyed in these works comes from both the artist’s rendering of each subject and the unexplained narratives contained within each. All of these aspects, along with his knack for realism, create a cinematic sensibility in Wang’s paintings.

“Through these paintings, I hope to create my own mythology,” he says. “This will be a mythology both of the world and outside of it, blurring the line between truth and fantasy, both deeply rooted in the world and apart from it. Ultimately, these isolated imageries will come together as a montage, revealing an inner logic that unites them.”

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