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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The Sci-Fi-Infused Paintings of Atsushi Fukui

Combining lush landscapes with pop and sci-fi elements, Atsushi Fukui’s paintings carry both a mystery and elegance in their execution. The artist has said that there isn't actually one narrative driving these scenes, yet he crafts the works in a way to imply so. A recent body of work carries both tones of space epics and mythology.

Combining lush landscapes with pop and sci-fi elements, Atsushi Fukui’s paintings carry both a mystery and elegance in their execution. The artist has said that there isn’t actually one narrative driving these scenes, yet he crafts the works in a way to imply so. A recent body of work carries both tones of space epics and mythology.

“Atsushi Fukui’s paintings depict utopian worlds that permeate with an air of peace and tranquility,” Tomio Koyama Gallery says. “From mushrooms and trees, to a young girl in the forest, animals, fragments of contemporary everyday spaces, scenes of ancient times, and the vast expanse of the universe –various elements resonate with another to create distant imagery and a sense of scale that transcends time and space, almost reminiscent of epic narratives dating back to the times of mythology.

See more of the artist’s work below.

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