Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The Recent, Striking Scenes of Amandine Urruty

Armed with charcoal and graphite, Amandine Urruty continues to craft scenes packed with characters and surprises in every corner. In recent works, the artist’s Victorian sensibility gorgeously renders both human and pop-cultural figures alike. Urruty was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 44.

Armed with charcoal and graphite, Amandine Urruty continues to craft scenes packed with characters and surprises in every corner. In recent works, the artist’s Victorian sensibility gorgeously renders both human and pop-cultural figures alike. Urruty was featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 44.

“As she masters techniques of traditional drawing, Amandine Urruty offers a charming gallery of deviant portraits, associating grotesque outfits with baroque decorum which miraculously reconcile lovers of alchemistic symbolism to young ladies with too much make up,” a recent statement says. “Indeed, Amandine Urruty builds her images like we would wander in the alleys of a Sunday fee market, borrowing to the mass of objects and their second hand toys their fundamental ambivalence, being wicked and peaceful, decorative and saturated at the same time.”

See more of her recent work below.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
French artist Amandine Urruty's busy graphite drawings overflow with humorous characters. Dog-faced people, sausages painting at easels, floating teeth, and tiny bed sheet ghosts run amuck in her whimsical worlds. One can spend a long time gazing at her drawings and examining each oddball creature. Though the artist's typical work is monochromatic and small-scale, she recently tried her hand at a large, colorful mural in Zaragoza, Spain. Take a look at some of her recent work below.
Paris, France based artist Amandine Urruty has always overflowed her whimsical drawings with fantastical characters. First featured on our blog here, Urruty is unique in her near exclusive use of the pencil medium. There is something about a pencil's 'primitive' and simple nature that initially attracted her to it. Her illustrations exhibit a remarkable control of the medium, and despite its easy use, she says, she is able to embellish her work with detail and varied palette. Most recently, her palette is almost entirely monochromatic black and white.
Felix Dolah uses diluted charcoal to craft his minimalist, ghostly drawings. These figures, often gangly and dilapidated, come in sparse singular or as heaps of crowded, writhing characters. Elsewhere, he applies the same material to photographs, adding grim accents to archival images. He's said that although early in life, he drew knights and monsters, "now I draw more monsters than knights."
Using just a pencil and paper, Nicola Alessandrini crafts striking, surreal imagery that explore the subconscious. The Italy-born artist creates scenes in which intimate figures are unraveled, producing strange growths and stripped of their normal defenses. Gender and sexuality also often play a role in Alessandrini’s works, as well as totems from childhood.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List