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The Dark Surrealist Collages of Andrew Blucha

The collages of Andrew Blucha, who works under the moniker “metafables,” crafts fantastical and dark-surrealist illustrations. The London artist’s motifs include skeletal, mystical blazes, and Victorian fashion. Contained within these are also contemporary winks.

The collages of Andrew Blucha, who works under the moniker “metafables,” crafts fantastical and dark-surrealist illustrations. The London artist’s motifs include skeletal, mystical blazes, and Victorian fashion. Contained within these are also contemporary winks.

The artist’s occasionally literalist titles add another layer of intrigue to the works, with recent pieces including “MY THOUGHTS ARE LIKE DARK WILD HORSES,” “THE TWO WHO STOLE THE MOON,” “How does it feel to be DEAD INSIDE,” and “FIRE BURNS BRIGHTER IN THE DARKNESS.” The artist’s illustration practice includes cover designs, labels, and more.

See more of Blucha’s work below.

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