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The Lush Paintings of Andy Dixon Explore Wealth, Art

Andy Dixon's vibrant and decadent paintings examine the relationship between art and money. Whether it's the personal rooms of patrons or coveted works from the Christie's catalog, Dixon’s lush pieces look at the worth assigned to objects and expressions. (The artist shows new examples of this in an upcoming show at Joshua Liner Gallery.)

Andy Dixon‘s vibrant and decadent paintings examine the relationship between art and money. Whether it’s the personal rooms of patrons or coveted works from the Christie’s catalog, Dixon’s lush pieces look at the worth assigned to objects and expressions. (The artist shows new examples of this in an upcoming show at Joshua Liner Gallery.)

“Signifiers of wealth abound in his large acrylic paintings, which take as their subjects stately lords, reclining nudes, ornate ballrooms, bathing beauties, and prominent paintings of the aforementioned motifs,” a statement says. “Borrowing content from Renaissance art, Flemish still lifes, and Google Image searches of ‘most expensive vases,’ his subject matter is selected on the basis of public expectation of what an expensive painting should look like. By sampling content verified as valuable by the market, Dixon positions his own work to ask, ‘What is the value of a painting of a valuable object?’”

See more of Dixon’s work below.

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