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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The Book Sculptures of Guy Laramée

Guy Laramée sculpts and “erodes” books into mountain landscapes. The artist says “the erosion of culture” is an ongoing theme in his sculptural work and paintings. The artist has been active for three decades, with several other disciplines in tow that include live music, theatre, and literature.

Guy Laramée sculpts and “erodes” books into mountain landscapes. The artist says “the erosion of culture” is an ongoing theme in his sculptural work and paintings. The artist has been active for three decades, with several other disciplines in tow that include live music, theatre, and literature.

“My work, in 3D as well as in painting, originates from the very idea that ultimate knowledge could very well be an erosion instead of an accumulation,” the artist says. “… Contemporary art seems to have forgotten that there is an exterior to the intellect. I want to examine thinking, not only ‘what’ we think, but ‘that; we think. So I carve landscapes out of books and I paint romantic landscapes. Mountains of disused knowledge return to what they really are: mountains. They erode a bit more and they become hills. Then they flatten and become fields where apparently nothing is happening. Piles of obsolete encyclopedias return to that which does not need to say anything, that which simply IS.”

See more of the artist’s work below.

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